The actomyosin interface contains an evolutionary conserved core and an ancillary interface involved in specificity - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles Nature Communications Year : 2021

The actomyosin interface contains an evolutionary conserved core and an ancillary interface involved in specificity

(1) , (2) , (2) , (3, 1) , (4) , (4) , (4) , (4) , (4) , (1) , (2, 5) , (2, 6)
1
2
3
4
5
6

Abstract

Plasmodium falciparum , the causative agent of malaria, moves by an atypical process called gliding motility. Actomyosin interactions are central to gliding motility. However, the details of these interactions remained elusive until now. Here, we report an atomic structure of the divergent Plasmodium falciparum actomyosin system determined by electron cryomicroscopy at the end of the powerstroke (Rigor state). The structure provides insights into the detailed interactions that are required for the parasite to produce the force and motion required for infectivity. Remarkably, the footprint of the myosin motor on filamentous actin is conserved with respect to higher eukaryotes, despite important variability in the Plasmodium falciparum myosin and actin elements that make up the interface. Comparison with other actomyosin complexes reveals a conserved core interface common to all actomyosin complexes, with an ancillary interface involved in defining the spatial positioning of the motor on actin filaments.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
284584_2_merged_1614073012.pdf (2.46 Mo) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)

Dates and versions

hal-03453769 , version 1 (29-11-2021)

Licence

Attribution - CC BY 4.0

Identifiers

Cite

Julien Robert-Paganin, Xiao-Ping Xu, Mark Swift, Daniel Auguin, James Robblee, et al.. The actomyosin interface contains an evolutionary conserved core and an ancillary interface involved in specificity. Nature Communications, 2021, 12 (1), pp.1892. ⟨10.1038/s41467-021-22093-4⟩. ⟨hal-03453769⟩
49 View
18 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More